We wrote last week that the EEOC recently sued on behalf of vulnerable farm workers – one of the EEOC’s priorities.   And we repeated what we had written before about the EEOC’s Strategic Enforcement Plan (“SEP”) intended to protect “vulnerable” workers, such as farm workers, migrant workers, workers in isolated areas, and mentally-challenged Henry’s Turkey

We have written before about the EEOC’s announced intent, as per its Strategic Enforcement Plan (“SEP”), to protect “vulnerable” workers.  We said on June 5, 2014: “‘The most vulnerable workers’ — this is a part of the EEOC’s strategic plan for enforcement.  Protecting them, that is, as we noted before – think farm workers,

Reuters reported yesterday that the EEOC has just sued a pawn shop chain in Brooklyn and Queens (that’s NYC), owned by a convicted fence known as “Fat Frank.”  The EEOC alleged that he fired five female employees after they complained that he called virtually all of the 40 female employees, who are mostly Hispanic, racial

It was a little disturbing and confusing to us that the EEOC jumped the gun in announcing a settlement in the Hawaiian farm labor case and was dealt a blow by the Court, which denied the EEOC’s consent decrees — at least for now.

Charles A. Krugel, a Chicago employment attorney who established and

We just posted an Alert! that the EEOC’s big press release (and wide press coverage) stating that is had settled the case of the Hawaiian farm workers was a tad premature — the consent decree was denied by the Court because the EEOC failed to follow proper procedure.   And the Court even threatened sanctions!

“The most vulnerable workers” — this is a part of the EEOC’s strategic plan for enforcement.  Protecting them, that is, as we noted before — think farm workers, migrant workers, workers in isolated areas, and mentally-challenged Henry’s Turkey workers.  (It also appears to be on the radar elswehere, as our similar recent blog about

“Vulnerable workers” – part of the EEOC’s plan for enforcement. Protecting them, that is. Think  farm workers, migrant workers, workers in isolated areas, and mentally-challenged Henry’s Turkey workers.   The EEOC has just announced that a federal court has awarded judgment to another group of farmworkers.

EEOC’s Strategic Enforcement Plan (“SEP)

On November 20, 2013

The New York Times just published a lengthy “front page center” piece by Dan Barry on the case of the intellectually disabled workers at Henry’s Turkey Service, the subject of the largest damage award in the history of the EEOC — $240,000,000 in a jury verdict.  It’s titled “the ‘Boys’ In The Bunkhouse,” and is

For quite awhile we have reported about the EEOC’s targets as set forth in its Strategic Enforcement Plan (“SEP), and noted that “vulnerable worker” abuse and religious discrimination were in the cross-hairs.  Two new settlements emphasize this.

18936794_sThe EEOC has reported that it has settled a religious discrimination case for $100,000 filed against an