Stereotypical Assumptions About Disabilities

Volvo Group North America, LLC will pay $70,000 and institute a three-year consent decree to resolve a federal disability discrimination suit brought by the U.S. Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC).

According to the suit, Volvo made a conditional job offer to a qualified applicant for a laborer position at its Hagerstown, Maryland facility.  The applicant,

In a post last March we stated:

Takeaway: Train your managers and staff in the ins and outs of the ADA;  always engage in an interactive process re seeking a reasonable accommodation for employees with disabilities; and do not rely upon stereotypical assumptions about people with disabilities.

This takeaway was occasioned by an EEOC

Today we will do a “takeaway” before and after we discuss an important new jury verdict in a disability case.

Takeaway:  Reliance on discriminatory customer preferences and stereotypes about what individuals with disabilities can and cannot do violates the ADA.

Now the case – a new jury verdict in a case brought by the 

Complying with the ADA in hiring (and in the workplace) means not only “treating people equally despite whatever physical challenges they may face” (as per the EEOC), but also not making assumptions or buying into biases or stereotypes about an applicant’s abilities based on a disability.

Treating someone adversely or differently based upon a “perception

Last January, we posted about a newly-filed EEOC lawsuit which alleged that a  nursing care facility offered two part-time positions to an applicant who is deaf (dietary aide/assistant cook).  The claim was that when he was called in for a follow-up interview with different managers he was “grilled about his ability to communicate,” after which

Here we go again – another couple of heath care facilities sued by the EEOC under the ADA.   Do you think it is merely a coincidence that such a large number of the EEOC’s ADA cases are against such companies?  If so, read our many posts on the subject.

What is it about health and

Summary You Cannot Fire Or Place A Pregnant Employee On Leave Because “The Baby Is Taking Its Toll On You” Or Because Of Potential Harm To The Baby Or Because “Pregnant Women Should Not Work”

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On March 13, 2013 we cautioned that the EEOC is very serious about pursuing discrimination cases filed under the

The EEOC has just sued one company for alleged pregnancy discrimination, and settled another such suit.   It appears from the EEOC press releases that the employers felt that it was not good for the pregnant women to be working.

According to one suit, a Maryland company fired an employee who notified it that she

The EEOC filed a lawsuit last year which alleged that a leading health care provider in Maryland violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), by failing to provide a reasonable accommodation and then firing a pulmonary function technologist because she suffers from Usher’s Syndrome, a genetic disorder that impairs hearing and vision.

The EEOC