Our posts about sexual banter and sexual harassment, and the relationship (if any) between the two, have brought out the best in our readers – thoughtful, enlightening and helpful comments

Tom Vogele, an Orange County, California attorney noted that “the nature of `harmless’ sexual banter is that it too often tends to escalate into

The title of this post expresses in sound-bite form an excellent and thoughtful comment, informed by experience, which we received from a reader who is a long-time HR professional.   Anthony J. Zagarino, PHR, a Human Resources Training & Development Manager in New Jersey wrote the following, which could be a great short primer on

In our recent post we reported that “Participating in sexual banter that was the norm in the “sexualized environment” of Sleep Country mattress stores in British Columbia cost an employee her sexual harassment claim.”   A couple reader comments caught our eye:

Claudia Orr, an employment attorney in the Detroit area commented:  “I have a

Participating in sexual banter that was the norm in the “sexualized environment” of Sleep Country mattress stores in British Columbia cost an employee her sexual23508094_s harassment claim.   The company claimed that all of its stores where this employee worked had a “sexualized environment” where “crude banter was the norm,” and the employee herself admitted that

We were overwhelmed with thoughtful comments to our recent post which questioned whether comments in the workplace such as "I love your new haircut" were harassment, mere sexual banter, or simply harmless compliments.   Most readers agreed that tone and context are of paramount importance, but there was still a lot of debate.  Read some of the many comments below.  

"The line between sexual banter and harassment can sometimes be indistinct, even blurred. But crossing it is costly.”  We posted this comment last week

How about when the comment does not rise to even mere banter but is only a casual remark or even simply a workplace compliment?  Are these comments safe or taboo?

Leanne Italie, writing for the