Same-Sex Sexual Harassment

Although sexual orientation discrimination is not prohibited under Title VII, same-sex sexual harassment is  —  as a species of gender-based sexual harassment.  The distinction is important.   (While Title VII affords no protection against discrimination based upon sexual orientation, an increasing number of states and municipalities have passed such laws, such as NYS and NYC.   See

Although Title VII does not prohibit employment discrimination on the basis of sexual identity or orientation, nonetheless same sex discrimination and/or sexual harassment is.  (While Title VII affords no protection against discrimination based upon sexual orientation, an increasing number of states and municipalities have passed such laws, such as NYS and NYC).   See our post 

Over $2 million, along with “a very strong consent decree,” is the price of settlement of an EEOC  same sex sexual harassment (and retaliation) lawsuit action against a New Mexico car dealership on behalf of over 50 men.

The complaint alleged that for ten years company managers “subject[ed] a class of men to egregious forms

We just wrote about same sex harassment and asked whether it was actionable under Title VII.  Title VII affords no protection against discrimination based upon sexual orientation, although an increasing number of states and municipalities have passed such laws.

As we said before, when there are allegations of same sex harassment asserted under Title VII,

Although an increasing number of states and municipalities have passed laws barring discrimination based upon sexual orientation,  Title VII affords no such protection.  When there are allegations of same sex harassment asserted under Title VII, the courts must go through a tortured analysis to determine whether it is actionable under Title VII, i.e., whether

A Charlotte-based private security company was just sued by the EEOC in a Title VII class action lawsuit for sexual harassment of male employees based upon their gender.  The employees, security officers, were allegedly harassed by a captain and lieutenant who made offensive comments to them, solicited nude pictures from them, asked them to undress in

The former aid to former Australian Federal Speaker Peter Slipper, who sued him for alleged sexual harassment, said that he will appeal the recent adverse ruling of the Federal Court which dismissed the case as an abuse of the judicial process, and ordering him to pay Slipper’s legal costs. The Standard reports that James Ashby,