reasonable accommodation for disability

“Low hanging fruit.”  Like “shooting fish in a barrel.”  Call it what you will, but “’shooting fish in a barrel’ is our way of describing the EEOC’s clear targeting of heath care providers for disability discrimination claims under the Americans With Disabilities Act (“ADA”).”  See our post on December 13, 2013 entitled “When Will Medical

“Shooting fish in a barrel” is our way of describing the EEOC’s targeting of heath care providers for disability discrimination claims under the Americans With Disabilities Act (“ADA”).   See our most recent post on December 13, 2013 entitled “When Will Medical Providers Learn Not To Be ‘Fish In A Barrel’ To Be Shot By The

The EEOC sued a Denver beverage distributor under the ADA, claiming that it eliminated a legally blind employee’s job as a driver’s helper, and refused to hire him as a night warehouse loader because it believed that he could not safely perform the functions of loading cases of liquor and kegs of beer into trucks.  

Two more ADA cases have hit the news this week, one of which involves – you guessed it – a suit against a medical center.  To repeat our mantra:  the EEOC is gunning for medical providers to sue under the ADA.

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The EEOC sued an Oakland-based medical center, Children’s Hospital and Research Center, on behalf

The EEOC just announced in its new regulatory agenda and plan that it will propose rules to coordinate with the Labor and Justice Departments for charge and complaint handling procedures involving disability discrimination claims invoking the ADA as well as the Rehabilitation Act.

As if to underscore this announcement, the EEOC also announced that it

An interesting question out of Louisiana was posed to the federal court of appeals recently.  A government attorney who was acknowledged to be disabled – osteoarthritis of the knee – requested as an accommodation a free on-site parking space.  The employer denied this request, arguing that the employee could not show “that the parking situation

Reasonable accommodation and the interactice process in disability situations has captured the EEOC’s attention.  And it should also capture the attention of employers and HR people.

A Tampa hospital has just been sued by the EEOC for refusing to accommodate a nurse’s request for a reasonable accommodation based upon a disability for which she needed