The EEOC has announced that it has sued a West Virginia mining company for national origin discrimination.  The company allegedly knew that its supervisory and non-supervisory personnel were regularly subjecting an employee of Polish ancestry to “degrading and humiliating comments, taunts and slurs.”

Title VII, of course, protects employees from national origin discrimination and harassment.

Just when we thought that maybe the N-word — just maybe — had been consigned to the dustbin of employment law history, three new EEOC lawsuits were filed this week in which this word was used against black employees.  See yesterday’s post for a description of the first such suit, and one court’s holding that

Reuters reported yesterday that the EEOC has just sued a pawn shop chain in Brooklyn and Queens (that’s NYC), owned by a convicted fence known as “Fat Frank.”  The EEOC alleged that he fired five female employees after they complained that he called virtually all of the 40 female employees, who are mostly Hispanic, racial

“How do we square these two rulings”?  

We asked this question on May 15th apropos a new decision from a three-judge federal appeals court panel sitting in Virginia which ruled that an employee’s calling the African-American plaintiff a “porch monkey” on two occasions did not constitute a hostile work environment.   After all, it was

Incidents of harassment against Muslim and Arab employees have been on the rise, with virulent and racist epithets and slurs at the core.

On October 2, 2013 we reported on a national origin and religious discrimination case filing by the EEOC against a car dealership in Illinois,  alleging a hostile work environment created against Muslim

Our recent post asked “how many times an employee must endure a crude and offensive racial or other epithet for the situation to become a hostile work environment?”   We also asked “Is management simply unaware or oblivious, or is the workplace environment top-down, and employees simply conduct themselves in accordance with what they feel

Very few topics which we have discussed in this blog have produced more reader comments than racial harassment, and specically racial slurs and epithets.   On May 15th we asked, based upon a few court decisions which we found difficult to reconcile,  how many many racial slurs must be made before a hostile work environment is

The EEOC has just announced that “In the past two months, the EEOC has had several cases involving severe racial harassment, including a $2.7 million settlement against an environmental clean-up company, and a harassment case in which a white employee was the victim.”   It has also just announced (1) the settlement of a long running