myths and fears about disabilities

If you were a critical care hospital would you fire a nurse with cancer who asked for an accommodation to get chemotherapy?  Even if you had meritorious grounds, would you do it, given the stark appearance of an ADA violation, as well as the horrendous publicity?

We wrote about such a case in a post

Today we will do a “takeaway” before and after we discuss an important new jury verdict in a disability case.

Takeaway:  Reliance on discriminatory customer preferences and stereotypes about what individuals with disabilities can and cannot do violates the ADA.

Now the case – a new jury verdict in a case brought by the 

The EEOC sued a Denver beverage distributor under the ADA, claiming that it eliminated a legally blind employee’s job as a driver’s helper, and refused to hire him as a night warehouse loader because it believed that he could not safely perform the functions of loading cases of liquor and kegs of beer into trucks.  

We have a particular penchant for tracking ageist code used by employers to mean “old” (mainly because, as language buffs, we are intrigued by the wide variety of terms used by creative employers), and new cases filed by the EEOC accusing medical and health care providers of discriminating against disabled people (mainly because, as employment