The Michigan Civil Rights Commission has taken significant action to clarify that its state statute prohibiting discrimination in employment on the basis of sex (among other characteristics) extends to prohibit employment discrimination based on orientation and gender identity:

The Michigan Civil Rights Commission voted 5-0 to approve a statement legally interpreting the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights

Query: a longtime employee, who has previously identified in your workplace as female, begins dressing for work like a man, grooming according to male standards, and identifying as male.  He begins to make arrangements to have his name formally changed, and a number of other legal documents changed as well.  He also begins using the

Title VIIAs my colleague Christina Stoneburner posted yesterday and today, North Carolina recently enacted the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act, which, among other similar state laws that continue cropping up (such as the recently vetoed religious exemption bill in Georgia), curtails protections based on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and/or Transgender (LGBT) status.  These proposed

TransMayor Bill de Blasio and the New York City Council have made no secret of their desire to expand the reach and protections offered by the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”).  This year saw the expansion of these protections, such as bans on using, or even inquiring about, individuals’ credit and criminal background

Although Title VII does not prohibit employment discrimination on the basis of sexual identity or orientation, nonetheless same sex discrimination and/or sexual harassment is.  (While Title VII affords no protection against discrimination based upon sexual orientation, an increasing number of states and municipalities have passed such laws, such as NYS and NYC).   See our post 

On May 27, 2011, the federal Office of Personnel Management issued guidelines to federal agencies regarding transgendered employees, i.e., those who are in transition from one gender to another. They must “all be treated with dignity and respect” consistent with the government’s policy of providing a discrimination-free workplace. 

 

The "guidance" defines and describes "gender identity