The EEOC has announced that it has sued a West Virginia mining company for national origin discrimination.  The company allegedly knew that its supervisory and non-supervisory personnel were regularly subjecting an employee of Polish ancestry to “degrading and humiliating comments, taunts and slurs.”

Title VII, of course, protects employees from national origin discrimination and harassment.

A North Carolina AutoZone store was just sued by the EEOC for national origin discrimination and harassment.

According to the EEOC, the Hispanic employee was forced to resign, after months of being subjected by the store manager and two co-workers to “unwelcome derogatory slurs, comments and jokes,” such as being called a “sp-c,” “beaner,” “border

Incidents of harassment against Muslim and Arab employees have been on the rise, with virulent and racist epithets and slurs at the core.

On October 2, 2013 we reported on a national origin and religious discrimination case filing by the EEOC against a car dealership in Illinois,  alleging a hostile work environment created against Muslim

10028116_sThree Bengali-speaking Muslim restaurant kitchen employees in Toronto who were mocked and reprimanded for speaking Bengali, subjected to comments about “cleaning Bengali sh-t from the kitchen,” forced to eat pork in violation of their religious beliefs and to break their Ramadan fast, and then fired, have been found by the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario

You may be forgiven if you thought that a hostile work environment was only created when an employee who was the target of racial, ethnic or gender slurs was a member of the race, ethnicity or gender that the slurs were directed at, i.e., a member of that particular "protected class."   

However, expanding the scope of  the New Jersey