The EEOC has recently filed an action in the Western District of Wisconsin entitled EEOC v. Baumann Farms, LLP alleging that the employer has an “English-only policy that discriminates against non-English speaking Hispanic employees based on national origin” in violation of Title VII. The complaint does not offer much detail on what’s in the policy—EEOC

Last December we reported on case from Michigan where a federal judge refused to grant summary judgment to a weight watcher’s group in an EEOC pregnancy discrimination lawsuit based upon the company’s policy of requiring job applicants to be within its set goal weight. The Court found that an issue of fact existed as to

This week a Michigan federal court refused to grant summary judgment to Weight Watcher’s in an EEOC pregnancy discrimination lawsuit based upon the company’s policy of9483943_s requiring job applicants to be within its set goal weight.  The Court found that an issue of fact existed as to whether the policy was related to the job

The EEOC had six charges filed with it between 2007 and 2009 alleging that the San Diego staffing firm Huyssen Inc., doing business as Sedona Group, engaged in a pattern and practice of classifying and failing to refer job applicants based on their race, color, sex, national origin, age or disability.

The EEOC just issued

One year ago, we asked employers the key question “Can You Pass The Acid Test?”

That is, can you feel secure that you have taken all possible steps to avoid discrimination or harassment lawsuits that, even if you win, can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to defend?    We wrote:  “An ounce of prevention

Do I have any understanding of the many anti-discrimination laws governing the workplace? Do I have any policies or procedures in place that will help me if I get sued by a disgruntled employee? Am I prepared for a discrimination lawsuit if it comes my way?

 

Good questions to answer in the affirmative. Can you also answer

Cases which allege hostile work environment based upon racial harassment have been the subject of a number of our blogs recently, in which we have observed the use of the ever-present “N-word” and the image of a noose, or a real noose.
 

Now, the EEOC reports that a federal judge has granted a rare

Apropos to our blog entry of October 9th, where we described the EEOC’s targeting of cases of harassment and abuse of “vulnerable” employees, especially farm workers, the EEOC announced yesterday that it settled a case against a vineyard in Ukiah, California on behalf of farm workers.

The suit alleged national origin harassment against