Religious Discrimination

Discrimination based upon religion is in the news, we said on August 24th, after the EEOC sued a Food Lion store in North Carolina for refusing to accommodate, and firing, an employee who is a Jehovah’s Witness.

The EEOC has just filed three new Title VII lawsuits based upon religious discrimination, with two involving the

Don’t discuss employees’ religion with them, especially not at a mandatory meeting, no matter how well-intentioned you are.   And certainly don’t take adverse employment actions against an employee who opposes such a company practice.   That is called “retaliation,” and it is illegal, sometimes even if the underlying practice is not.

Settlement Of Retaliation Suit Gives

We reported last week about the Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. decision holding that a closely-held, non-religious corporation whose owners had religious objections to providing certain forms of birth control could be exempt from the Affordable Care Act mandate requiring coverage for birth control.  The decision, although seemingly limited by the majority, may have

The EEOC has just announced a new lawsuit on what has become a familiar topic – the alleged refusal of an employer, an Alabama nursing home, to accommodate a Muslim employee whose religious beliefs require her to wear a hijab, or head covering.   These religious discrimination cases relating to appearance are now almost cookie cutter

Incidents of harassment against Muslim and Arab employees have been on the rise, with virulent and racist epithets and slurs at the core.

On October 2, 2013 we reported on a national origin and religious discrimination case filing by the EEOC against a car dealership in Illinois,  alleging a hostile work environment created against Muslim

“More than 100 people — activists, court enthusiasts and reporters — gathered outside the Supreme Court building early Monday, awaiting the last day of the court’s term, when the justices were expected to rule on whether President Obama’s health care law can require corporations to pay for insurance coverage for contraception.”      Thus spake the New

7340045_sThe online news is abuzz with discussions about the EEOC’s latest lawsuit against United Health Program Services based in Syosset, New York.  According to the complaint, United Health forced its employees to engage in various activities such as holding hands, praying, burning candles and telling co-workers “I love you.”

I must admit that I had