Pregnancy Discrimination

As of April 1, 2018, employers in Massachusetts will be required to provide accommodations to pregnant employees.

In July, the Governor signed into law the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act that amends the Massachusetts’ general discrimination law to require employers to provide a reasonable accommodation to pregnant employees and to prevent employers from discriminating against pregnant

As I was getting ready for work this morning, the Today Show had a profile of Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo, who announced that she was expecting twins.  The profile noted that when Mayer had her first child, she declined Yahoo’s (rather generous) Maternity Leave Policy and took only one week off from work.  The

38570848_sIn the vein of a shameless personal plug, I will be speaking as part of a panel in an upcoming Strafford live webinar, “Accommodating Pregnant Workers After Young v. UPS: Navigating New Obligations Absent Clear Court Guidance” scheduled for Wednesday, July 15, 1:00pm-2:30pm EDT.

Our panel will discuss how to reconcile the Court’s

36714348_sAlthough the facts alleged in a recent lawsuit entitled EEOC v. D&S Shipley Donuts are not quite as patronizing as the title of this post suggests; they are close.  The EEOC brought suit against a franchisee of Shipley’s Do-Nuts claiming that the franchisee violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the

In our post about the recent New York Times’ article, which we entitled The Motherhood Trade-Off, we noted that “the authors write about why working women in the US find it more difficult to return to work after having kids than their European counterparts.”

Link:  http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/14/upshot/us-employment-women-not-working.html?ref=business&abt=0002&abg=0)

maternity leave : Stressed Woman With Newborn Baby Working From Home Using Laptop

We publish below some interesting comments on the

In a New York Times article today variously entitled “Why U.S. Women Are Leaving Jobs Behind,” or “The Flexibility Gap,” the authors write about why working women in the US find it more difficult to return to work after having kids than their European counterparts. 

“The Motherhood Trade-Off,” they sub-title the article, and describe the

There are two takeaways in today’s post.

First:  Beating a dead horse, we are constrained to remind health care and medical providers, yet again, that the EEOC continues to target you for ADA violations, or (in the case we will discuss), Title VII pregnancy violations; and

Second:  Be aware that Title

Law360 has just reported that a jury in California has awarded $872,000 in compensatory damages and a whopping $185 million in punitive damages (more than was requested) to a plaintiff who claimed gender discrimination and retaliation in that “she was fired after complaining that she was demoted after giving birth.”

money : stack of dollars

The link to the Law360

This is a sad commentary about the extent of entrenched discriminatory animus in a nation that, in fact, prohibits pregnancy discimination in employment.

We have just read in the Daily Mail Australia that the Australian Fair Work Ombudsman has reported that pregnancy discrimination makes up — by far  — the largest number of employment discrimination