National Origin Discrimination

Earlier this month, the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) announced a proposal to update its guidance on employment discrimination based on national origin.   The proposal, which marks the EEOC’s first update to this particular guidance in 14 years, contains important information for employers and is available for public comment until July 5, 2016.

What’s

Today’s post comes to us courtesy of Martin Burns, an associate in the Roseland office:

According to a recently filed lawsuit, Hajra v Wawa, by a former employee of Wawa, Inc., his manager singled him out and enforced an English-only policy because he spoke with an accent.  The former employee claims that the

The EEOC has announced that it has sued a West Virginia mining company for national origin discrimination.  The company allegedly knew that its supervisory and non-supervisory personnel were regularly subjecting an employee of Polish ancestry to “degrading and humiliating comments, taunts and slurs.”

Title VII, of course, protects employees from national origin discrimination and harassment.

A North Carolina AutoZone store was just sued by the EEOC for national origin discrimination and harassment.

According to the EEOC, the Hispanic employee was forced to resign, after months of being subjected by the store manager and two co-workers to “unwelcome derogatory slurs, comments and jokes,” such as being called a “sp-c,” “beaner,” “border

Incidents of harassment against Muslim and Arab employees have been on the rise, with virulent and racist epithets and slurs at the core.

On October 2, 2013 we reported on a national origin and religious discrimination case filing by the EEOC against a car dealership in Illinois,  alleging a hostile work environment created against Muslim

I just read a fascinating article by Derek Mong in Asian Fortune, which calls itself “an English language newspaper for Asian American professionals in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.”

The takeaway: “If you’re a minority in America’s workplaces, a name can mean the difference between the opportunity for success and rejection.”   What does this

The EEOC just announced the commencement of a new national origin lawsuit against a Green Bay manufacturer for allegedly firing Hmong and Hispanic employees “based on 10-minute observations that marked them down for their English skills, even though those skills were not needed to perform their jobs.  All of those fired had received satisfactory ratings

10028116_sThree Bengali-speaking Muslim restaurant kitchen employees in Toronto who were mocked and reprimanded for speaking Bengali, subjected to comments about “cleaning Bengali sh-t from the kitchen,” forced to eat pork in violation of their religious beliefs and to break their Ramadan fast, and then fired, have been found by the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario

For quite awhile we have reported about the EEOC’s targets as set forth in its Strategic Enforcement Plan (“SEP), and noted that “vulnerable worker” abuse and religious discrimination were in the cross-hairs.  Two new settlements emphasize this.

18936794_sThe EEOC has reported that it has settled a religious discrimination case for $100,000 filed against an