Disability Discrimination

This week, the University of Southern California terminated Steve Sarkisian, their head football coach.  The firing came after a cavalcade of headlines that Sarkisian, essentially the CEO of a multi-million dollar enterprise, was increasingly showing up at practices, team functions, and even games allegedly under the influence of alcohol.  The move came one day after

Small WorldThe recent measles outbreak making headlines at Disney properties in California has been unnerving, to say the least. As any parent can attest, a visit to Disney is likely to be on someone’s wishlist at some point (as my two small children have already made clear!). Beyond planning a visit to see Mickey and Minnie,

Perhaps this is the coda to the story of Henry’s Boys — perhaps not.

Readers no doubt recall Henry’s Turkey — the poster bird for the abuse of intellectually disabled employees.  We wrote about the legal case on behalf of these disabled employees many times — as recently as last week (see below).

Dan

An Illinois manufacturer of steel castings for the rail industry was just sued by the EEOC for allegedly violating the ADA.  The EEOC alleges that the company illegally asks job applicants if they “have a history of carpal tunnel syndrome and gives them a nerve conduction tests.”  Seehttp://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/newsroom/release/11-20-14.cfm.

carpal tunnel : Carpal Tunnel Syndrome cartoon of a man with a sore wrist. Illustration

Although the EEOC press

If you were a critical care hospital would you fire a nurse with cancer who asked for an accommodation to get chemotherapy?  Even if you had meritorious grounds, would you do it, given the stark appearance of an ADA violation, as well as the horrendous publicity?

We wrote about such a case in a post

Another employer has settled a GINA class action brought by the EEOC – for $187,500.

The EEOC told a Practising Law Institute conference two years ago of a number of workplace issues which it planned to address, one of which was  targeting violations of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (“GINA”).  The law was new (2009),

Last week we reported about the EEOC entering into a consent decree settling a disability suit for $30,000.  The suit was against a Minneapolis-area home health care provider for failing to provide a reasonable accommodation to a housekeeping employee who suffered from fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis — and then firing her.

We stressed a few major