New York State Human Rights Law

Monday, New York’s budget bill for FY 2019 was presented to the Governor for signature.  Buried among the usual budget line items are several provisions that will drastically affect employers.

In what seems to be a direct response to the #metoo movement, the bill sets training requirements, prohibits mandatory arbitration of discrimination claims, and outlaws

Catherine Savio writes:

Courthouse pillars
Copyright: bbourdages / 123RF Stock Photo

On May 31, 2017, the Second Circuit seemingly broadened the scope of liability under a New York state anti-discrimination law by holding that non-employer third parties can be held liable for violating rules regarding the use of a job applicant’s criminal

Copyright: <a href="http://www.123rf.com/profile_damedeeso">damedeeso / 123RF Stock Photo</a>

End of year vacations and holidays are fast approaching. Everyone is eager to see family and enjoy some much needed time away. It is easy to forget, however, that the ball drop in Times Square will not only ring in the New Year, it will also ring in various new and modified employment laws in

Sounding like our old friends at the EEOC,  the New York Attorney General just announced a settlement with  five New York City employment agencies relating to, among other things, allegations that the agencies “targeted Spanish-speaking job seekers, unlawfully steered them away from certain jobs and unlawfully referred them to jobs paying as little as $3.75

The Civil Rights Bureau of the New York Attorney General’s office has just announced the settlement and discontinuance of an investigation into an upstate nursing home where the AG sought to determine “whether the [nursing home] accommodated and acceded to the racially discriminatory preferences of patients by making reassignments of nurses on the basis of

Two weeks ago we wrote about the (in)famous decision of a federal judge in NYC who recently ruled that an unpaid female intern who alleged sexually harassment by a company higher-up was not an “employee,” and therefore had no claim for hostile work environment under the New York City Human Rights Law (N.Y. City Admin.

A judge in New York City has just held that an employee who alleged that she was fired for being short did not state a claim under New York state law which protects against genetic discrimination in employment and therefore prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of a

“predisposing genetic characteristic.”

The Plaintiff was employed

Since the Supreme Court’s Gross decision, a federal ADEA plaintiff has a higher burden to prove discrimination – she must establish that “but-for” unlawful discrimination, the employer would not have taken the adverse action, such as firing her. The former “mixed motive” analysis used in ADEA discrimination claims became unavailable to ADEA plaintiffs under Gross.  On June

One of the hot topics of employment law in the past few years has been the concept of independent contractors and the liability associated with improperly designating an employee as an independent contractor. However, I have not seen much written with respect to how independent contractors are handled under one of the more employee friendly