First, a disclaimer.  Let me assure you that the contributors to the Employment Discrimination Report run the full gamut of the political spectrum.  This is not a post about politics, it just so happens that our demonstrative example comes from the presidential race.

It is not uncommon for employers and employees to execute Non-Disclosure Agreements

Marriage is tough.  And with the divorce rate in the United States hovering around fifty percent, unless you work in a monastery, there are likely divorced individuals in your workplace.  This week, the New Jersey Supreme Court clarified that the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination’s protections for marital status protect those who are separated, in

My colleagues will often joke of my mildly-paranoid nature when giving legal advice.  Although not an untrue assessment, such paranoia is not unfounded, and decisions such as the Second Circuit’s decision several days ago in Graziadio v. Culinary Institute of America, No. 15-888-cv (2d Cir. Mar. 17, 2016) reaffirm for me that a healthy

As most employers are acutely aware, additional employee protections, prohibitions, and, most importantly, costs continue to pile on to the employer community every year, particularly in New York City (among other jurisdictions).  In addition, this trend shows no sign of abating given the current legislative environment.  As a consequence, thoroughly vetting prospective employees has become

Last week, the calendar officially turned to winter.  While the weather has been uncharacteristically balmy in the Northeast, soon temperatures will plunge and cold and flu season will arrive.  In New Jersey, two employees who were terminated from their jobs after declining work-issued immunizations have brought suit claiming that the termination was nothing more than

Update:  Back in October, we brought you the story of Former USC Football Coach Steve Sarkisian and how the USC Administration handled alleged instances of  Sarkisian drinking on the job.  Sarkisian has filed suit in California State Court, claiming that, inter alia, he was terminated on the basis of his disability (alcoholism) .  He

38552358_sIn a highly anticipated decision, the NLRB today departed from three decades of an accepted standard for joint employment status and issued a new test that makes it far more likely that, even if a company does not directly employ an individual, it may be liable for employment torts and other encumbrances. (See Browning-Ferris Industries,